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HomeBrewPower
Alaska WVO Stove!
Date: Jan 2, 2008 9:53:17 AM PST
Author: HomeBrewPower

We have a bunch of used but good condition 45k btu heaters (Military Surplus M1941) coming in that will burn a multitude of liquid fuels, like kerosene, diesel, used fryer oil, etc. This is a DIY Tinker type item, not a ready to run appliance. Can be installed in an existing wood stove or drum (We expect to have the original wood/coal stove for these oil kits available soon). These sell for $50 delivered in the USA, and we are working out a quantity drop ship to the UK for local delivery. For USA customers, send steve@green-trust.org an email, for EU customers, send a email to andy@homebrewpower.co.uk

We have a digitized manual available at http://www.green-trust.org/Alaskan%20Oil%20Heater/

Andy Mahoney
www.HomeBrewPower.co.uk
Kind regards Andy Mahoney Home Brew Power (Off-Grid Power Installer - UK) www.homebrewpower.co.uk
 

 

catalanman
Initial trials using the Alaska Stove
Date: Feb 16, 2008 10:09:21 AM PST
Author: catalanman

For the past few days I have been testing the burn characteristic's of the Alaska Tent Stove which can be purchased on e-bay.As bought, you receive the guts of the stove which is a well engineered vaporising pot burner complete with constant level valve. Other items include jerry can connector, 2 lengths of hose complete with fittings (one length is supply, the other overflow) and a chimney top. The last 4 items I did not use but placed in my ever expanding store.
The outer part of the stove can easily be made from a half size oil drum, cut the bottom 1/3 off, a neat cut all way round, invert the base and make a loose fit with the rest of the drum, cut out for the burner and c.l.v (constant level valve), fit a 4'' (100mm) flue and complete with some simple plumbing and you are away. The initial firing of the burner was with diesel, good firing rate and an even blue flame producing plenty of heat with no smoke. Adjustment of the flame is easy, use the marked dial on the c.l.v., it takes perhaps 1 to 2 minutes for the oil level in the burner pot to re-adjust. I had already made a mix of 25% diesel - 75% filtered recycled vegetable oil and poured this into the header tank feeding the burner. This percentage mix can produce smoke and the viscosity of the fuel can present a little problem for the c.l.v. A better result was obtained from a 30%/70% mix, the burner running all day with very little attention. At the end of the day's trial the burner was dis-assembled in order to examine the base of the burner pot. Burning recycled vegetable oil can be a problem insomuch as the deposit left behind after combustion. I was most supprised to find little deposit in the burner pot and what was there was easily cleaned. The viscosity of the r.v.o. needs to be addressed, perhaps by preheating the oil and or to reduce cost even further the substitution of perhaps turpentine instead of diesel (with due regard to the vapor point/flash point of turpentine). It would be an easy task to make an heat exchanger for the production of hot water for this heater but first to improve the combustion and running of the stove using recycled oil. This is to be the next stage.
Last modified by catalanman on Feb 16 2008 10:29AM
 

 

catalanman
Alaska Stove 2nd Trial
Date: Feb 19, 2008 3:24:01 PM PST
Author: catalanman

To-day, 19th January, carried out the 2nd trial of the blend of fuel for the Alaska stove. Heating oil here in Spain costs E0.89 cents / litre (66pence equivilent UK). The main tasks in using recycled vegetable oil are threefold -1)Reduce the carbon footprint - 2)Re-use a product readily available locally and 3)Reduce expenditure on household budget! The manufacture of bio-diesel here in Spain as its difficulties, methanol here is hard to come by in reasonable quantity and what you can get is expensive, E2.17/litre (£1.60)which makes a 80 litre batch on 20% methanol plus lye, electrical costs etc add up to 49cents / litre. Pump prices here are E1.03 (76pence)/litre. Perhaps we can leave making bio-diesel later. The pressing need at the moment is for heating oil. The first tests carried out using filtered recycled vegetable oil were very promising but I felt that the viscosity of the oil should be made thinner to induce a better flow of oil into the vaporising burner.On the first test I could not get the flame to encompass the central burner tube nor climb the full height of the pot even with the central burner ring removed. The flame seemed reluctant to climb the full height of the pot. I decided to make a blend of fuel making the bulk of the mix r.v.o based but add turpentine (to lower the viscosity) and retain the diesel for its burn characteristic. The first blend was made from a mix of 4 parts r.v.o. plus 2 parts turpentine plus 2 parts diesel. The Alaska Stove fire's up easily on diesel and you can quickly turn over to the blend for normal running.Results of this firing were very good. The oil vapourised in the base of the heater and good solid blue flames with light yellow tips were evident in the burner pot but only up to 3/4 of the height of the pot and no evidence of the central burner tube but certainly a better burn than the previous day or mix. It should be mention here that these heaters are atmospheric type and the chimney plays a very important role in the firing of the heater. I am very fortunate in that my property extends to an outside BBQ kitchen, totaly enclosed with the exception of a entrance, (no door and 2 windowless openings) on one wall there is a BBQ range with a chimney. My burning rig sits on the BBQ base, approx 800mm off the floor and the 100mm chimney from the rig enters the chimney of the building. On the initial trials I used just one length of flue pipe to enter into the chimney. This error proved to be one of the 2 cause's of lack of complete burn in the pot. I had by this time retired to my workshop to inspect the 2 other carburator's I had purchased with the heater and when I had dismantled them found that the inlet valve opening on the 2 spare carb's varied to the one fitted to the stove. The 2 spares had a diameter of 1.5mm and the one fitted to the stove as supplied had a hole of 1.25mm. This is a difference in area of approx. 30%! Also the outlet (supply) to the stove as a corresponding reduction in it's size. This I thought had to have an effect on the supply of fuel through the carburator and hence to the burner. An executive decision was made, drill out the INLET VALVE opening to 2mm on one of the spare carb's in order to better deliver oil to the carb. but leave the supply cross sectional area the same. My thinking on this being that the short supply pipe into the burner gets warm and this should be sufficient to compensate for freer oil supply and in any case, if the carb. flooded, the overflow should balance the excess. Back to the outside kitchen, reassemble the burner AND add a further length of flue pipe to the burner making a total length of 2 metres which took the stove chimney the full length of the building chimney with approx. 100mm projecting above the top. The void between the 2 chimney's was then filled with rockwool to seal the cavity in order to prevent a cooling effect on the inner (stove) chimney. The rig was then left ready for the following morning.
Last modified by catalanman on Feb 25 2008 9:07AM
 

 

Falcon
Smoking Alaska
Date: Apr 23, 2009 12:35:30 AM PDT
Author: Falcon

Trying to burn used engine oil in my Alaska but it doesn't burn cleanly. I want to use it to heat WVO prior to pumping it into a biodiesel processor but everything gets covered in oily soot!
The alaska is fitted into a garden incinerator (dustbin style with plenty of ventilation) but the oil never vapourises and the flames are always yellow.
Ideally I need to burn WVO,glyceron and UEO but not impressed so far. Maybe I need to blend the oil with some bio to thin it down, will try that next.
 

 

MickH
S -tube type diesel pot burner
Date: Mar 29, 2012 12:48:16 PM PDT
Author: MickH

Dear Forum I am a pressurejet oil firing engineer but ancient at 71. I see the Pot burners such as Kabola and Refleks are extortionate re cost. The burners you mention are of great interest to me but I would really require one that has a lot less output in the order of 12.000 Btus (3.5 Kw)to heat the water in my static caravan. I believe the one I need is the trekker but has the S-tube type burner which is more efficient than either of the abovementioned R & K burners. I have a cast iron Boiler which is capable of 30.000 Btu's which would be OK to pick the heat up from the burner. I intend to burn my home made Biodiesel in it & at 40p per litre re the cost of fuel it will be a lot more economical than propane re our ascot multipoint -as well as the poor as piss flow rate (excuse the quote) I see how the S-tube works but cannot find any exact references to actually make it as well as it seems to be covered by a patent ??????? I'll look forward to hearing what is available in the uK... Thanks Regards Mick
 

 

HomeBrewPower
S -tube type diesel pot burner
Date: Oct 4, 2012 11:25:38 PM PDT
Author: HomeBrewPower

Mick, if you want to burn bio then look
at the Babington Nozzles I well, you can
configure them to output in a huge range
and they are extremely efficient to use.



Originally Posted by MickH:
Dear Forum I am a pressurejet oil firing
engineer but ancient at 71. I see the Pot
burners such as Kabola and Refleks are
extortionate re cost. The burners you
mention are of great interest to me but I
would really require one that has a lot
less output in the order of 12.000 Btus
(3.5 Kw)to heat the water in my static
caravan. I believe the one I need is the
trekker but has the S-tube type burner
which is more efficient than either of
the abovementioned R & K burners. I have
a cast iron Boiler which is capable of
30.000 Btu's which would be OK to pick
the heat up from the burner. I intend to
burn my home made Biodiesel in it & at
40p per litre re the cost of fuel it will
be a lot more economical than propane re
our ascot multipoint -as well as the poor
as piss flow rate (excuse the quote) I
see how the S-tube works but cannot find
any exact references to actually make it
as well as it seems to be covered by a
patent ??????? I'll look forward to
hearing what is available in the uK...
Thanks Regards Mick
Kind regards Andy Mahoney Home Brew Power (Off-Grid Power Installer - UK) www.homebrewpower.co.uk

Attachment:
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Handmade Babington Burner Nozzles UK

 
 
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